Great Deals on Garden Kits - Eartheasy.com
Visit Our Online Store!Find tools, heirloom seeds, + great garden resources!

3 Easy Tips for Small-Space Composting

Share This!

Are you an urban organic gardener? Here are a few helpful small-space composting tips…

For urban gardeners and others without a lot of garden space available, composting can pose a challenge. Some neighborhoods may frown upon composting due to perceived odors (though this should not be a problem if you are composting correctly), and some people – for example, those who live in an apartment or condo – simply may not have the space on their property for a compost pile.

Fortunately, there are more options for urban and small-space composting available now than ever before. From enclosed compost tumblers, to small and attractive compost bins and more, urban organic gardeners have a number of choices for making their own compost.

Here are 3 options to consider, plus 3 tips for success with small-space composting:

Worm Bin

The easiest way to compost indoors cheaply, easily, and quickly is to use a worm bin. Vermiculture (or worm composting) produces worm castings that make worm tea that is perfect for feeding the soil of your container plants.

Read more about vermiculture is small spaces here.

…………………………………………………………….

Five-gallon buckets

Another option is very inexpensive and stackable. You can find 5-gallon buckets with lids at home centers and big-box stores. Also, large kitty litter containers work great, too! Be sure to drill aeration holes near the top of the bucket.

………………………………………………………………..

Bokashi (Japanese term meaning “Fermented Organic Matter”)

The Bokashi method is easy and composts everything—from kitchen scraps to meat and dairy. You mix an inoculated bran filled with microbes into the Bokashi bucket and tightly cover it. When the bucket is full, seal it shut and set it to the side for 10 to 12 days. Every other day, drain the bucket (which also makes a nice compost tea). You’ll have a pre-compost, which can be put in worm bins or leave it for a month to let it break down further.

…………………………………………………………

3 Tips for Success:

  • Have shredded paper or dry leaves handy. Every time you add food scraps or coffee grounds, plop in a handful of the shredded paper or leaves. This will keep your bin from getting too wet. Note: Junk mail works perfectly for this purpose as long as it is not the slick-coated advertisements.
  • The contents of your bin need to be turned often. Turning the contents of your bin warms it up and microbes very happy. It also mixes the contents, so they don’t get too wet or too dry. Move everything around with a hand trowel. An advantage to the round bucket method is that you can roll it back and forth a few times to mix it.
  • No matter what kind of bin you have, add small pieces. Pulp from your juicer will breakdown much faster than chunks of vegetables. Chop up your food scraps or put them through a blender, and be sure to shred your paper or cardboard.
Read more at TheGrowNetwork.com

 

Share This!

 

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *